law-offices-of-stacy-sabatiniemail  845-243-0295

EMAIL OR CALL TO SCHEDULE A CONSULTATION

family-law-attorneys-new-york

Family Law Blog New City, New York

News and insights about divorce and family law in New York.

New York Divorce Mediation and Nesting

One of the hardest struggles for families going though a divorce, especially those with young children, can be the division of the family into two separate homes. For children, the process can increase feelings of upheaval, stress, and loss while parents may struggle with the financial burden of acquiring a second home, paying property taxes, and the cost of replacing household items that became property of the other spouse at the conclusion of the proceedings.

Some families, however, have developed their own unique way to slowly progress towards living in separate homes: “nesting” or “bird nesting” has become a smart option for families that want to reduce upheaval in the home and save money on expenses.

Rate this blog entry:
2
Continue reading
1662 Hits

Parenting Plan Modifications

Whenever a couple with children divorce, a parenting plan helps facilitate the transition by outlining the terms of custody and visitation as well as other issues that affect their child. Once the parenting plan is accepted by the court, it is official and enforceable: violations of the parenting plan have serious consequences, including loss of custody.

If, however, one or both parents want to change the original parenting plan, the court allows for modifications in most circumstances. New York law provides parents with 3 options for parenting plan modifications: coming to an agreement on their own, using custody mediation, or litigating the proposed modification in family court.

The easiest way to modify a parenting plan is when both parents agree with the changes: the modified parenting plan is simply filed and (usually) accepted by the court.

When couples don’t agree on the proposed changes to the parenting plan, they can either choose to use a custody mediator or to take their case to family court.

Rate this blog entry:
2
Continue reading
1363 Hits

Divorce Mediation and Gray Divorces

Divorce rates are increasing for couples in long-term marriages. Known as a “gray divorce,” these couples have issues unique to the length of their marriage as well as their age.

Gray divorces are much more complex than the divorce of a couple married for a shorter time: special issues like retirement, home equity, and possible ailing health of the parties can complicate the divorce process significantly.

As the rate of gray divorces continues to climb, so does the number of couples who choose divorce mediation over traditional divorce litigation.

Rate this blog entry:
3
Continue reading
1762 Hits

Property Division in New York Divorce

Dividing a couple’s property during a divorce can lead to confusion and endless arguments; whether the property at issue is your great-grandmother’s antique clock, the kitchen table, or your primary residence, New York law establishes who gets what during a divorce and the division might not be as obvious as couples think.

Rate this blog entry:
3
Continue reading
1636 Hits

The Effect of Alcohol and Drug Use on New York Custody Cases

Whether you are concerned about the alcohol or drug use of the parent of your child, or your own use has been questioned, alcohol and drug use can impact your New York custody case.

The use of drugs and alcohol can affect the entire family; however, the impact of parental alcohol or drug abuse can be especially devastating to a child. Like all legal cases involving children, the court’s objective is to come to a custody arrangement that is in the best interest of the child. Because parental substance abuse can deprive the child of stability, safety, and a healthy relationship with the using parent, the court takes parental drug and alcohol use seriously.

Rate this blog entry:
3
Continue reading
2522 Hits

client-testimonials-side

SCHEDULE A CONSULTATION

To schedule a consultation with a divorce mediation lawyer, please fill in this confidential form or call (845)-243-0295.
Please fill in all required fields.
The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.
captcha
Reload